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Collaborations and Partnering – Transcell
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Collaborations and Partnering

Transcell Oncologics embraced a unique business impetus in which it collaborates with Federal State Institution PIROGOV NATIONAL MEDICAL SURGICAL CENTER of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow on research engine and partnership platform in cancer research.

In keeping with the mission of the company to discover drugs for Indian and global cancer patients communities, Transcell Oncologics has entered into a research arrangement with MNJ Institute Of Oncology & Regional Cancer Centre, Hyderabad.


In cancer research, diversity makes a difference
NEWS / 05.18.17
Sequencing prostate tumors from African-American men reveals a novel tumor suppressor gene

African-American men develop prostate cancer more often than other men, and it tends to be more deadly for this population. Some of the differences seem to be due to socioeconomic factors, but scientists wondered whether the disparities are also rooted in the tumor genome.

To explore whether racial disparities in prostate cancer incidence and prognosis stem from molecular and genetic differences, a team of researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard including Broad institute member Levi Garraway and postdoctoral researcher Franklin Huang gathered tumor samples from 102 African-American men with prostate cancer and analyzed their exomes.

The success of this effort in uncovering subtle genomic differences and revealing a new prostate cancer gene demonstrates the power of including diverse populations in genetic analyses. Discoveries made from studying patients of diverse ethnic backgrounds can shed light on the underlying biology of this disease for all patients.